Staff directory

Publications

2018

  • On the use of Parylene C polymer as substrate for peripheral nerve electrodes

    De La Oliva N., Mueller M., Stieglitz T., Navarro X., Del Valle J. Scientific Reports; 8 (1, 5965) 2018. 10.1038/s41598-018-24502-z.

    Parylene C is a highly flexible polymer used in several biomedical implants. Since previous studies have reported valuable biocompatible and manufacturing characteristics for brain and intraneural implants, we tested its suitability as a substrate for peripheral nerve electrodes. We evaluated 1-year-aged in vitro samples, where no chemical differences were observed and only a slight deviation on Young's modulus was found. The foreign body reaction (FBR) to longitudinal Parylene C devices implanted in the rat sciatic nerve for 8 months was characterized. After 2 weeks, a capsule was formed around the device, which continued increasing up to 16 and 32 weeks. Histological analyses revealed two cell types implicated in the FBR: macrophages, in contact with the device, and fibroblasts, localized in the outermost zone after 8 weeks. Molecular analysis of implanted nerves comparing Parylene C and polyimide devices revealed a peak of inflammatory cytokines after 1 day of implant, returning to low levels thereafter. Only an increase of CCL2 and CCL3 was found at chronic time-points for both materials. Although no molecular differences in the FBR to both polymers were found, the thick tissue capsule formed around Parylene C puts some concern on its use as a scaffold for intraneural electrodes. © 2018 The Author(s).


  • Segregation of motor and sensory axons regenerating through bicompartmental tubes by combining extracellular matrix components with neurotrophic factors

    del Valle J., Santos D., Delgado-Martínez I., de la Oliva N., Giudetti G., Micera S., Navarro X. Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine; 12 (4): e1991 - e2000. 2018. 10.1002/term.2629.

    Segregation of regenerating motor and sensory axons may be a good strategy to improve selective functionality of regenerative interfaces to provide closed-loop commands. Provided that extracellular matrix components and neurotrophic factors exert guidance effects on different neuronal populations, we assessed in vivo the potential of separating sensory and motor axons regenerating in a bicompartmental Y-type tube, with each branch prefilled with an adequate combination of extracellular matrix and neurotrophic factors. The severed rat sciatic nerve was repaired using a bicompartmental tube filled with a collagen matrix enriched with fibronectin (FN) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) encapsulated in poly-lactic co-glycolic acid microspheres (FN + MP.BDNF) in one compartment to preferentially attract motor axons and collagen enriched with laminin (LM) and nerve growth factor (NGF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) in microspheres (LM + MP.NGF/NT-3) in the other compartment for promoting sensory axons regeneration. Control animals were implanted with the same Y-tube with a collagen matrix with microspheres (MP) containing PBS (Col + MP.PBS). By using retrotracer labelling, we found that LM + MP.NGF/NT-3 did not attract higher number of regenerated sensory axons compared with controls, and no differences were observed in sensory functional recovery. However, FN + MP.BDNF guided a higher number of regenerating motor axons compared with controls, improving also motor recovery. A small proportion of sensory axons with large soma size, likely proprioceptive neurons, was also attracted to the FN + MP.BDNF compartment. These results demonstrate that muscular axonal guidance can be modulated in vivo by the addition of fibronectin and BDNF. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


  • Time course study of long-term biocompatibility and foreign body reaction to intraneural polyimide-based implants

    de la Oliva N., Navarro X., del Valle J. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A; 106 (3): 746 - 757. 2018. 10.1002/jbm.a.36274.

    The foreign body reaction (FBR) against an implanted device is characterized by the formation of a fibrotic tissue around the implant. In the case of interfaces for peripheral nerves, used to stimulate specific group of axons and to record different nerve signals, the FBR induces a matrix deposition around the implant creating a physical separation between nerve fibers and the interface that may reduce its functionality over time. In order to understand how the FBR to intraneural interfaces evolves, polyimide non-functional devices were implanted in rat peripheral nerve. Functional tests (electrophysiological, pain and locomotion) and histological evaluation demonstrated that implanted devices did not cause any alteration in nerve function, in myelinated axons or in nerve architecture. The inflammatory response due to the surgical implantation decreased after 2 weeks. In contrast, inflammation was higher and more prolonged in the device implanted nerves with a peak after 2 weeks. With regard to tissue deposition, a tissue capsule appeared soon around the devices, acquiring maximal thickness at 2 weeks and being remodeled subsequently. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed two different cell types implicated in the FBR in the nerve: macrophages as the first cells in contact with the interface and fibroblasts that appear later at the edge of the capsule. Our results describe how the FBR against a polyimide implant in the peripheral nerve occurs and which are the main cellular players. Increasing knowledge of these responses will help to improve strategies to decrease the FBR against intraneural implants and to extend their usability. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 106A: 746–757, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.