← Back

News

Thursday, 08 August 2019

The evolution of technology transfer in Spain

IP & Technology Transfer Officer Jordi Reverter, from the ICN2 Business and Innovation Department, has written a brief summary of the evolution of technology transfer in Spain in the last fifteen years that is published in les Nouvelles - Journal of the Licensing Executives Society. Spain occupies de 9th position in the worldwide ranking of scientific production, but only the 30th position in innovation. Why?

In the context of the current knowledge societies, knowledge and technology transfer is considered the third mission of public research organisations, as it becomes a fundamental element for economic development. IP & Technology Transfer Officer Jordi Reverter, from the ICN2 Business and Innovation Department, has written a brief summary of the evolution of technology transfer in Spain in the last fifteen years that is published in les Nouvelles - Journal of the Licensing Executives Society.

With his analysis, Reverter tries to answer an intriguing question: Spain occupies the 9th position in the worldwide ranking of scientific production, but only the 30th position in innovation. Although this kind of gap is usual for European countries, in Spain is even broader. Why?

In the article, Reverter shows the evolution of the legislative framework, which was very inappropriate for technology transfer before 1988, and since then has been undergoing a process of adaptation to this new reality. However, in the following two decades the results were below the expectations. The Spanish business fabric, composed mainly of Small and Medium Enterprises with a very weak innovation tradition, helps to understand this slow evolution.

Then the global crisis arrived, and although some programmes which aimed to strengthen the link between public research organisations and industry were implemented, such as the University Strategy-2015 or the International Excellence Campus, the context of decrease of private investment in R&D did not help. After the crisis period (2012-2017), the R&D activity recovered slightly, but the IP generation showed the worst results of the decade.

Finally, it is noteworthy that over the last ten years, the Knowledge and Technology Transfer Offices have significantly improved, acting as a true public-private interface, while maintaining a close and professional dedication to researchers.

Article reference:
Reverter Cendrós, Jordi. Technology Transfer in Spain During the Last Fifteen Years (April 30, 2019). les Nouvelles - Journal of the Licensing Executives Society, Volume LIV No. 2, June 2019. https://ssrn.com/abstract=3380557