News

Thursday, 16 November 2017

ICN2 researchers compute unprecedented values for spin lifetime anisotropy in graphene

Researchers of the ICN2 Theoretical and Computational Nanoscience Group, led by ICREA Prof. Stephan Roche, have published another paper on spin, this time reporting numerical simulations for spin relaxation in graphene/TMDC heterostructures. Published in Physical Review Letters, their calculations indicate a spin lifetime anisotropy that is orders of magnitude larger than anything observed in graphene until now. Here, lead author Aron Cummings explains the origin of this effect.

Wednesday, 08 November 2017

Discover ICN2 technologies at MEDICA 2017

As a partner of the Graphene Flagship, the ICN2 will be displaying two technology demonstrators at the world's largest medical trade fair, MEDICA 2017. Its graphene sensor for the early detection of neurological events such as epileptic seizures and retinal implant will be on display from 13 to 15 November in Dusseldorf, Germany.

Tuesday, 24 October 2017

Self-assembly of highly-porous crystalline particles into novel photonic materials for sensing applications

Researchers from the Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (ICN2) and the Institute of Materials Science of Madrid (ICMM-CSIC) have formed highly-porous metal-organic framework particles that spontaneously assemble into well-ordered 3D superstructures that present photonic crystal properties. Published in Nature Chemistry, their discoveries are expected to find applications in the design of novel photonic materials for sensing applications, among others.

Friday, 03 November 2017

100xCiencia2: Co-creating Value in Scientific Research

100xCiencia.2 was held in Alicante yesterday and today. It brought together the vanguard of Spanish research: the Severo Ochoa and María de Maeztu centers of excellence. The meeting was opened by Carmen Vela, Secretary of State for Research, Development and Innovation, and she highlighted the importance of approaching science and business: "Without transfer there is no innovation and without innovation there is no future"

Thursday, 19 October 2017

Strange but true: turning a material upside down can sometimes make it softer

There’s no way that turning a material upside down makes it any softer, right? Wrong! Through the combined effect of two properties inherent to certain types of crystal, flexoelectricity and piezoelectricity, researchers at the ICN2 led by ICREA Prof. Gustau Catalán have found that polar materials can be made more or less resistant to dents when they are turned upside down… or when a voltage is applied to switch their polarisation. Published this week in Advanced Materials, this research points to the future development of “smart mechanical materials” for use in smart coatings and ferroelectric memories.